China’s Jidu Robo-1 Looks Like It’s From the Future. Maybe It Is

According to Tu Le, general director of Sino Auto Insights, an analytical group focused on China’s automotive sector, the partnership with Geely might provide Jidu a significant boost in the notoriously difficult business of producing automobiles in high number and with great dependability. He continues by saying that China’s car sector is electrifying more swiftly than either Europe or the US due to government initiatives, a less established gasoline-powered industry, and the country’s sizable population, which makes it easier for new technology to spread quickly.

Mingyu Guan, a partner at the consulting firm McKinsey & Company who specialises in the sector, claims that the Robo-1 is an example of how big, forward-thinking, and rapidly developing China’s auto industry is. Guan asserts that the majority of significant Chinese internet companies are engaged in some form of automotive technology development and that customers want an app-like driving experience. China, according to Guan, “is like the industry’s guiding beacon.”

Another indication of the development of China’s IT sector is Baidu’s foray into the auto business via Jidu. Large internet, social media, and well-known app firms have recently been under heightened regulatory pressure and scrutiny, with tough new regulations governing data privacy and algorithmic transparency, for example.

Mingyu Guan, a partner at the consulting firm McKinsey & Company who specialises in the sector, claims that the Robo-1 is an example of how big, forward-thinking, and rapidly developing China’s auto industry is. Guan asserts that the majority of significant Chinese internet companies are engaged in some form of automotive technology development and that customers want an app-like driving experience. China, according to Guan, “is like the industry’s guiding beacon.”

In order to further autonomous driving, Baidu has made large expenditures and gained government support. The Chinese government selected Baidu as one of a select group of artificial intelligence “national champions” in November 2017 and charged them with creating an industry-wide platform for autonomous driving. Additionally, having the support of the government offered Baidu an advantage while negotiating with current automakers. The business published more than 3,700 patent applications for the technology in China in March. And in April, Beijing acquired the nation’s first authorization for testing autonomous vehicles without a driver behind the wheel thanks to Apollo Go, Baidu’s driverless taxi service that now runs in ten Chinese cities.

Apollo also interfaces into a smart-city platform that Baidu offers and that 41 Chinese cities have already accepted. This platform guarantees to assist local authorities in applying AI to anticipate and control traffic, road safety, and pollution. At Baidu’s annual developer conference in December 2021, CEO Robin Li emphasised the potential of autonomous driving to lower traffic jams, congestion, and carbon emissions in China.

Jidu will undoubtedly find solace in the overall development of the Chinese car sector, which has been largely fueled by the popularity of electric vehicles. According to data from the China Passenger Car Association, an industry association, sales of electric cars in China increased by 169 percent in 2021 when compared to the previous year. In China, the percentage of electric vehicle sales in 2021 was 14.8%, compared to 4.1 percent in the US. A rising number of EVs are currently being exported to Europe by Chinese automakers.

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